All Is Lost to find Robert Redford an Oscar?

"Production still by Richard Foreman courtesy of All Is Lost Productions, LLC"
"Production still by Richard Foreman courtesy of All Is Lost Productions, LLC"

“Production still by Richard Foreman courtesy of All Is Lost Productions, LLC”

There is something about stories that tell the tale of survival—by pitching a lone man against all odds, against the moody and often merciless nature—that they trickle the flow of intellect in an audience, and force them to get drawn right from the beginning and sympathize all along the character’s journey. Universal Pictures is bringing to life one such moving tale of man’s survival, with their latest thrilling offering, All Is Lost.

Written and directed by Academy Award® nominee J.C. Chandor, containing the soul-uplifting musical score by Alex Ebert, and starring none other than the iconic, Academy Award® winner, Robert Redford, All Is Lost is a thriller set at sea, where the audiences will witness Redford surviving against the harsh open-sea life.

The trailer for All Is Lost is now out, and one gets glimpses of what a heroic tale and on-screen success this may turn out to be. So far, by the first look of it, the movie seems to have all the promising ingredients for a successful thriller: great lead cast, a survival story, element of ‘human-ness’ that audiences can relate to, and the emotional content of ‘what-will-happen-next’ that keeps all age-groups glued to the seat.

Production Still AIL-Credit-Andrew-Illson Courtesy Universal Pictures

Production Still
AIL-Credit-Andrew-Illson
Courtesy Universal Pictures

As per the official synopsis released by Universal Pictures, All Is Lost tells the story of an unnamed man (Redford), who “wakes to find his 39-foot yacht taking on water after a collision with a shipping container left floating on the high seas. With his navigation equipment and radio disabled, the man sails unknowingly into the path of a violent storm.”

The trailer further indicates of the catastrophic situation Redford is stuck in, with his S.O.S calls seemingly going unheard, his shouting for help in the middle of nowhere echoing back with no results, his aging body taking the toll, supplies dwindling away, and an open-sea with its deadly preying life leaving him at the mercy of destiny.

References are bound to come from past movies, especially Tom Hanks’ Cast Away, George Clooney’s The Perfect Storm, and the recent Life of Pi, and if their success is anything to go by, then All Is Lost sure will generate a lot of Academy Award® buzz. And rightly so. Perhaps its time Redford won a Best Actor Academy Award® and judging by the first looks of All Is Lost, he sure seems to be a solid contender.

Watch the All is Lost Official Trailer by Universal Pictures Australia here: http://youtu.be/HUWsGw1Uq_E.

All Is Lost releases in Australian Cinemas on November 14, 2013.

Pubic Relations Strategist, Movie Critic and Freelance Contributor at local Sydney Media Outlets and Sydney Editor at Student View.

1 Comment

  1. Colin D

    05/02/2014 at 1:06 am

    I read several reviews before watching ‘All is Lost’. Unfortunately, it seems that all the critics, the script writer, director and producer have the same level of knowledge about sailing and seamanship – sweet f… all!

    The holes in the script are so big that the errant shipping container would float through without touching the sides! Here are just a few examples:
    1. The sailor has no idea about how to make an SOS (Mayday or Pan Pan) call.
    2. The damage caused by that initial incident was very unlikely given the complete lack of wind and calm seas at the time.
    3. An open and heavy shipping container with an opening below the water line remains floating – go figure.
    4. The nautical chart used depicts an area in the vicinity of 25 degrees WEST longitude – which is in the mid-Atlantic rather than anywhere in the Indian Ocean!
    5. An experienced ocean going sailor watches for storms, and reduces sail well before the wind is too strong for the amount of canvas they has up – and certainly does not attempt to rig a storm jib in a raging gale.
    6. A properly equipped yacht has a manual bilge pump handle either already inserted in the pump or tied securely so that it doesn’t disappear – one does not really want to have to find a broomstick in order to whittle a handle when waters pouring into the cabin.
    7. The first thing any sensible sailor would have done is stuff cushions and any other available material in the hole to stem the ingress of water, and only then deal with the other issues. They would certainly NOT sail around on port tack with a hole in starboard side below the water line while having a look-see at the culprit of their demise.
    8. An ocean going sailor who does NOT know which type of flare to use when, or how to fire them?
    9. Only an idiot would start a fire in a life raft made of flammable synthetic material.

    There was not one action that Redford’s character took that was a sensible thing to do – from either the action itself or the timing thereof. Apart from the initial contact with the sea container there was no bad luck involved – all the events that unfolded in the story were a direct consequence of the character’s stupid decisions. He deserved to die a lonely death.

    The only thing this piece of cinematic crap is useful for is as a training resource for sea safety and survival courses showing everything that a sailor should NOT do when a crisis develops at sea. This must be the worst movie that Robert Redford has ever made, and will have anyone with even a basic knowledge sailing and seamanship guffawing at the character’s absolute and enduring incompetence – as well as that of the script writer, director, producer, and so-called professional critics! I was embarrassed at having invited friends to attend on the basis of the reviews published by critics who appear blinded by the previous charm and acting credentials of “ol’ blue eyes”. I suspect he will regret having put his name to this project, though I also expect the brainless movie industry sycophants will obsequiously laud it as a masterpiece. 0/10

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