Lavazza Italian Film Festival – The Red And The Blue Review

An indulgent observation of life in a modern day high school, highlighting without much ado, the jarring gaps by Education Providers together with the far reaching impact of this intangible service on sensitive young minds, The Red And The Blue borders on the comic without attempting to be much of a brain tease.

THE RED AND THE BLUE 4 copy Courtesy: Ned & Co and Lavazza Italian Film Festival 2013

THE RED AND THE BLUE 4 copy
Courtesy: Ned & Co and Lavazza Italian Film Festival 2013

The Red And The Blue is about a modern high school. The school professor Prezioso [Riccardo Scamarcio] is young, and eager to experiment with new methods.

In pursuit of his convictions, he deftly enough handles the notion of apprehension that the chemistry teacher Eleena Lietti is filled with; he even decides to overlook propriety to Angela [Silvia D’Amico], a flighty but somewhat troubled student.

His chief motive is their betterment.

THE RED AND THE BLUE 1 copy Courtesy: Ned & Co and Lavazza Italian Film Festival 2013

THE RED AND THE BLUE 1 copy
Courtesy: Ned & Co and Lavazza Italian Film Festival 2013

The atmosphere change impacts the principal, Margherita Buy who from being indifferent begins to shower motherly love on a child abandoned by parents.

The old Professor Fiorito [Roberto Herlitzka]  however continues with his cynicism induced feelers to the teachers. Age seems to have played havoc with him for instead of being indulgent and totally devoted to shaping the young minds, he acts different.

In a way The Red And The Blue finds all those involved standing next to the enthusiasm-filled-teaching-ladder, some love to climb it and want to reach the top, while others consider it fragile-and-tottering, not worth the effort but each does so backed by an experience individual to him.

THE RED AND THE BLUE 5 copy Courtesy: Ned & Co and Lavazza Italian Film Festival 2013

THE RED AND THE BLUE 5 copy
Courtesy: Ned & Co and Lavazza Italian Film Festival 2013

As the movie ends we all get an alarm button tinkle as to how the teaching profession can once again touch the heights of noble glory.

Cliché ridden and some banality notwithstanding it is a smart, sermon-less flick, enjoyable in its own exclusive way.

Rating: 2.5 stars

By Joseph Rana

Pubic Relations Strategist, Movie Critic and Freelance Contributor at local Sydney Media Outlets and Sydney Editor at Student View.

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